University of Southern California

Rodgers Lab

USC Stem Cell

Lab Overview

Stem cells are the driving force behind your body’s ability to grow and repair damaged tissues and organs. To do this, stem cells of many different types work together in time, space and scale. But how the action of stem cells is coordinated to achieve tissue growth and repair is largely a mystery. We are focused on uncovering the signals and communication networks that instruct stem cells to effectively work together.

Cross section of a mouse tibialis anterior muscle, stained for laminin (green), smooth muscle actin (red) and nuclei (blue) (Image courtesy of the Rodgers Lab)
Time lapse images of a muscle stem cell dividing (Image courtesy of the Rodgers Lab)
EM micrograph of a muscle stem cell with cellular structures shaded in (Image courtesy of the Rodgers Lab)
H&E staining of skeletal muscle four days after a muscle injury (Image courtesy of the Rodgers Lab)
Newly regenerated muscle fibers identified by embyronic-myosin heavy chain staining (red) and centrally localized nuclei (Image courtesy of the Rodgers Lab)